On things that don’t change.

Today I did not march.
I took my beautiful, clever, inspiring girl and her equally fabulous friend to see ‘The Woman in Black’ in Glasgow. The play is based on the novel by Susan Hill and was adapted by the hugely talented and much missed Stephen Mallatratt.
This production starred two highly accomplished and mesmerising actors: as David Acton as Kipps and Matthew Spencer as The Actor.
And as I watched,  I realised that things are going to be ok.

I first saw the play in London in 1999 as part of a school drama trip from Huntingdon. As a drama teacher, it was a surprise to others that I had not seen it before. It was the absolute bread and butter of the GCSE live performance review paper and as soon as I saw it, I knew why. It exemplifies a huge range of dramatic conventions and techniques as well as a cornucopia of technical devices that one rarely experiences within one performance. It reminds us so powerfully of what drama and imagination can do: to create a horse and trap from a basket; to produce Spider the dog out of thin air and to tell a complex story through the incredible skill of just two performers and the collective imagination of the audience members; to force us to feel intensely and to venture into the lives of others. And teenagers love it.

I saw it again a few years later in Newcastle and so today was my third time. It was a joy to watch again and this time to share it with my girl.

 

Today I took some new messages from this classic: messages that I had not picked up previously about attachment and separation, looked after children and trauma, mental health and the need to tell our stories. And about the fact that there are some things beyond our comprehension and control.

But above all I was reassured by the fact that it is still the same, still so powerful, still such a timeless testimony to the power of drama and culture to transport us to another place where we can reflect on human nature and experience.
Politicians will come and go. Political decisions will impact on us for a while and then things will move on. But universal, archetypal, cultural experiences will continue to unite and enlighten us.
On the way home she asked whether we can see a Shakespeare.
Certainly, my lovely. Because 400 years on and we will still have more in common with that master of language and imagination than we do with the temporary rhetoricians and charlatans of today.

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